Wednesday, October 21, 2020

Twins

Twins

 


                   What's better than one handsome rooster?


                     Twin handsome roosters.




Sunday, October 18, 2020

We'll see!

                                                     Kevin Cohn
 



We’ll see.

 

            This story is copied without permission.  You can give the author full credit and see what he is applying it to at:  https://munrkazmir.medium.com/well-see-35a25640075e .

 

 

“We’ll See.”

Once upon a time, on a fine fall morning, an old farmer went out to tend his animals and crops.

At first light, the farmer was dismayed to see his fence had been crushed by a falling tree during the night. All three of the farmer’s prized horses had disappeared.

The other villagers moaned in sympathy: “Whatever will you do?” they asked the farmer. “This is terrible,” they all cried, shaking their heads sadly, “and right before harvest time, too.”

“Your harvest will rot in the field. What will your family eat this winter? How will you get your crop in without horses?” one of the villagers asked the old farmer.

“We’ll see,” was the farmer’s only reply as he returned to his chores.

Later on that morning, the farmer heard the sound of hooves and, looking up, saw his three horses had returned! What was more, the three horses had two wild horses running with them.

Soon, the villagers were heard to express their delight at the farmer’s good fortune.

“What a wonderful thing to have happen!” the other villagers cried. “What a wealthy man you will be with this new stock of animals!”

“We’ll see,” was all the old farmer would reply.

After lunch that day, the farmer’s son was trying to break one of the wild horses to the saddle. Suddenly, the wild horse threw the son to the ground. Running to his injured son, the farmer found his son’s leg badly broken.

The neighbors were soon around to give their opinions.

“What a terrible calamity,” the villagers said. “What a disaster.”

“Now you really won’t be able to get your crop in, without a strong son to help you. He will take months to heal. Whatever will you do now?” the other villagers asked the farmer in despair.

The farmer would only shrug and say: “We’ll see.”

Later that afternoon, military officials rode into the tiny village, with a great clattering of weapons and jostling of horses. Looking grim and serious, the soldiers announced an official conscription. Every young and able man was to be drafted into service that very day.

The farmers son, having just been injured, was left behind, even as other sons and husbands were taken.

No one in the village could believe the old farmer’s good fortune. And not everyone was entirely happy about it.

“Surely the most tremendous good fortune has smiled upon you today,” the villagers grumbled. “How can anyone be so lucky?”

But the old farmer would only reply, “We’ll see.”

The End

 

 

The parable applies to my plant world this year.  We were doomed and then we weren’t.

 

            Will the houseplant boom continue into 2021?

 

            We’ll see!


Saturday, October 17, 2020

Rooster view

         

         Sometimes you just need to see a handsome Rooster to make your day




Sunday, August 30, 2020

State of the Business

Sinningia 'Gabriel's Horn' grown by Gary's Specialty Plants




The State of the business.

 

            Presidents give State of the Union addresses, trade magazines collect State of the Industry facts.  I should give a State of this Business report.

 

            This recession is not affecting me this time as houseplants are in high demand, contrary to the 2009 recession, which crushed sales of Annuals.

 

            If you don’t have a job, you really don’t have to buy a Petunia.

 

            Houseplants may be different.  They don’t cost much, and they could make you feel better.

 

            Some of those who are employed, which is over 80% of the work force, are interested in houseplants.  And on the collector side of things, don’t really care what rare plants cost.

 

            I have unusual plants and strive for the rare.  It’s where the money is.

 

            If there is a trend, it’s that price barriers are breaking, and we don’t’ have to get squeezed by high input costs.  We can charge more if necessary and garden centers are able to profit from higher prices.

 

            Price is a signal.  If indoor gardeners will pay higher prices, we should produce more uncommon plants.

 

            The State of this Business is very good.




 

Sunday, August 9, 2020

Doomsday Update

We're going to be alright 


Doomsday update.

            On March 15, when the United States shut down, I didn’t think that we would ever sell another plant.
           
            The Horticulture industry was panicked.  With Spring plant sales in jeopardy, it was easy to predict bankruptcy ahead.

            But retail sales started to open up and doomsday was averted.

            The pent-up demand overwhelmed garden centers and most recorded extra high sales.

            What happened to us?

            We had several eCommerce customers who suddenly found themselves with double the orders.  Indoor gardeners were trapped at home.  Hey, “Let’s order a plant.  UPS will bring it to my house.”

            We have had difficulty growing enough plants to catch up.

            No one could have predicted this year’s events.  No one knows how to predict what’s next??

            If I continue the baseball metaphor, now I’m winning 46-23.  Impossible, unlikely game?

            Yes.

Tuesday, July 7, 2020

Is there innovation in a small hanging basket?

Plastic Hanging Baskets



Innovation is intriguing.  How does it happen?

The history of innovations is well told by Matt Ridley in "How Innovation Works".  He has fascinating stories of how new inventions came into being and increased our standard of living.

            He argues that even the light bulb was not a lightning bolt of inspiration.  Edison built on all previous knowledge and then trialed and error-ed through 6,000 types of filaments until one worked.

            Ridley builds the case that innovative ideas are most likely a rearrangement of previous good ideas.  Sometimes ideas were ahead of the technology of machines or materials. 

            Hanging baskets was such a simple idea.  Why didn’t we think to do this before?

            Take a pot of flowers and put a hanger on it so it could be hung on your porch.

            That word from the movie ‘The Graduate’ was right ---- “Plastics”.  The development of plastic pots with flexible hangers saved Spring flower growers by giving them a new income stream. 

            Ubiquitous plastic containers replaced all those terra-cotta clay pots and associated broken backs lugging them around.

            So, with all these hanging baskets, how can a new size be considered an innovation?

            When I saw the little basket at Strange’s Garden Center in Richmond, I knew that this is what I’ve been looking for.

            Existing hanging baskets for houseplants are too big and too heavy.

            Through some detective work, I found that I could import this 10 cm basket from Holland by way of Canada.

            This 4” basket will replace our 4.5” and give indoor gardeners that ‘wittle’ hanging houseplant that they didn’t know they wanted.

            That’s how innovation works.




Sunday, July 5, 2020

'Nanouk' Tradescantea - Now you can see.

'Nanouk' Tradescantea



          Now we have a picture.  My son solved the upload a picture problem.

              'Nanouk' Tradescantea

          Everyone will want one.